Should you stay in or get out of academia? Eric Weinstein weighs in

Should you stay in or get out of academia? Eric Weinstein weighs in

Part of me believes every academic is also a recovering romantic. Pursue your passions. Make good grades. Get the right letters from the right places. Adjunct. Publish. Repeat. So the story goes to tenure. 

Or does it?

I've written about why I think that modus operandi no longer works elsewhere so I won't bother debating its utility here. Instead, I'd like to share some words with you from Eric Weinstein — one who was neck-deep in academia but opted to enter a booming field instead of remaining in a shrinking one.

A short story of my journey to linguistics, from the Bible

A short story of my journey to linguistics, from the Bible

When I first set out to learn the biblical languages I did so from an earnest intent to be able to, simply put, read the Bible better. The margin notes in my NASB had nagged me for years: "Lit. Hebrew is to gird." Well why not put thatif that's what the Hebrew really says?! I was so baffled by these marginal notes and was so eager to read the Bible for all its worth that I decided learning Biblical Hebrew and Greek was the best way forward.

Book Review: An Interpretive Lexicon of New Testament Greek

Book Review: An Interpretive Lexicon of New Testament Greek

The following book review of An Interpretive Lexicon of New Testament Greek is divided into two major sections — (1) Areas of Praise As It Stands, and (2) Areas of Improvement for Future Editions — because although the review is more heavy in its critical evaluation, I believe the volume has the potential to be a handy resource for students of the Greek New Testament for years to come as it increases in utility with future editions. And it's the hope of this review that some of these areas might be taken note of. (For a more general overview of the Interpretive Lexicon see the reviews by Exegetical Tools orReading Acts).

A New Model for Mapping Meaning

A New Model for Mapping Meaning

Words do not have senses.

At least in the sense we like to think they do.

Our understanding of the meaning of words is largely shaped by our interactions with dictionaries. A dictionary is a heuristic tool that helps a user learn the different meanings associated with certain expressions — the key word being “heuristic”.

Contrary to popular belief, the goal of lexicographers in creating a dictionary is not to lay down with pen and paper the conceptual semantic structure of a language’s wheelhouse of words. Those in this guild of dictionary-making are painfully aware of the impossibility of that task. Instead, they posit artificial semantic demarcations (commonly referred to as dictionary senses) and freely admit that

Christo van der Merwe + Alex Andrason = Research you must read

Christo van der Merwe + Alex Andrason = Research you must read

Two people just put their minds together and produced a piece of content that you're going to want to read: Alex Andrason and Christo van der Merwe. I've written and worked with Alex on other topics and so I know, firsthand, the value that he brings to the table.

Assuming you care for linguistics and Biblical Hebrew, Christo needs no introduction; but I will say from my experience with him as an MA supervisor that any kind of collaborative research is such an energizing experience as he constantly positions himself as someone who can learn from you, though the reverse is often more so the case.

So what happens when these two work together? Now you get a chance to see.